Alice rest of the year to do

Alice Paul did a lot for women by challenging laws to get equal rights for women. She protested like no one else ever had, was chairman in the National American Women’s Suffrage Association (NAWSA), and founded the National Women’s Party (NWP). Alice Paul even fought for her rights in prison; she is a very important part in women’s history. If it wasn’t for the things Alice Paul did for women, we probably would not have the rights we have today. She even worked very hard to write the Equal Rights Amendment. She was a very strong and dedicated woman.
Alice Paul was born on January 11, 1885 in Moorestown, New Jersey. She attended Swarthmore College and graduated in 1905. After graduation she took the rest of the year to do graduate work at the New York School of Social Work. After that, she went to England in 1906 to continue her education in social work. She got her master’s degree in 1907 from the University of Birmingham and London. She received her Ph.D. in 1912 from the University of Pennsylvania. While she was in England, she faced a difficult times but still managed to keep up her work in school and fight for what she thought was right, which started her journey and through some influences she joined the militant wing of the British Suffrage Movement.
During her work in the British Suffrage Movement, Alice participated in protest for equal rights for women. When she was protesting outside Parliament and was arrested. In jail she went on a hunger strike and the guards tied her up and force fed her through a funnel. Still protesting she threw up everything they tried to feed her. While she was in there she met Lucy Burns, they did a little protesting together and were arrested together again. Alice returned to the U.S. in 1910 and Lucy also went but to Brooklyn in 1912.
In 1912 Alice and Lucy met up and joined NAWSA, Alice was 26 at the time. In March of 1913 Alice Paul organized the biggest protest ever and marched from t…