Alexander the Great

In 334 B.C. Alexander crossed the Hellespont.Something that his father had planned but didn't fully achieved.He defeated the Persian forces that were gathered on the Asian side of the River Granicus.After this victory Alexander sent three hundred suits of Persian armor back to Athens.The message that went with them read, Alexander, the son of Philip, and the Greeks, except the Spartans, have won this spoil from the barbarians of Asia,thus expressing in one brief and self-assured sentence his contempt for the Persians, his even greater contempt for the Spartans, and his conviction that he was furthering a Greek cause.Of all the generals of the ancient world Alexander was surely the greatest.He possessed an almost clairvoyant insight into strategy and was a consummately resourceful tactician.
Alexander could be compared to Napoleon in swiftness and in movement, but Alexander could be patient as well.As he showed in his siege of the fortress of Tyre, which lasted for about seven months.The old port of Tyre had been abandoned for some time, and the Tyrians were now securely enclosed behind massive walls on an island that was half a mile from the shore.Alexander made attempts to negotiate an entrance into the city but they were halted by a display of force against his envoy by the Tyrians. Alexander was determined to run every risk and make every effort to save the Macedonian army from being held in contempt by a single undistinguished city.This commitment turned out to be far more exacting then Alexander could have ever imagined.Nevertheless, his determination and aversion to failure drove him to conjure up a more imaginative approach.He built a solid causeway over the water, half a mile long and two hundred feet wide.Then he constructed siege towers of 150 feet in height.Unfortunately the Tyrians responded to each and every effort with innovations of their own.At one point during the siege, his a…